ARC Review: That Thing We Call a Heart by Sheba Karim

Hiya guys! I am super glad I got to win an ARC copy of That Thing We Call a Heart by Sheba Karim from Mindy McGinnis’s amazing website Writer, Writer Pants on Fire. I actually have met Sheba twice, and she was super nice! I got to first see her at the SE-YA Book Fest and later have her sign my beautiful ARC at Sandhya Menon’s signing for When Dimple Met Rishi (it is such an amazing book by the way) since she conversed with Sandhya over her debut. She is such a great and talented writer, and here’s my review of her newest YA novel That Thing We Call a Heart..


About the Book25752164

Shabnam Qureshi is a funny, imaginative Pakistani-American teen attending a tony private school in suburban New Jersey. When her feisty best friend, Farah, starts wearing the headscarf without even consulting her, it begins to unravel their friendship. After hooking up with the most racist boy in school and telling a huge lie about a tragedy that happened to her family during the Partition of India in 1947, Shabnam is ready for high school to end. She faces a summer of boredom and regret, but she has a plan: Get through the summer. Get to college. Don’t look back. Begin anew.

Everything changes when she meets Jamie, who scores her a job at his aunt’s pie shack, and meets her there every afternoon. Shabnam begins to see Jamie and herself like the rose and the nightingale of classic Urdu poetry, which, according to her father, is the ultimate language of desire. Jamie finds Shabnam fascinating—her curls, her culture, her awkwardness. Shabnam finds herself falling in love, but Farah finds Jamie worrying.

With Farah’s help, Shabnam uncovers the truth about Jamie, about herself, and what really happened during Partition. As she rebuilds her friendship with Farah and grows closer to her parents, Shabnam learns powerful lessons about the importance of love, in all of its forms.

Featuring complex, Muslim-American characters who defy conventional stereotypes and set against a backdrop of Radiohead’s music and the evocative metaphors of Urdu poetry, THAT THING WE CALL A HEART is a honest, moving story of a young woman’s explorations of first love, sexuality, desire, self-worth, her relationship with her parents, the value of friendship, and what it means to be true.

Goodreads


A 4 Star

Disclaimer: I won a free ARC of this book in a giveaway.

Overall Thoughts: I am super glad that I was able to win Sheba Karim’s That Thing We Call a Heart from a giveaway Mindy McGinnis held on her website Writer, Writer Pants on Fire. I loved this book a lot. It definitely was one that I couldn’t put down. I finished this while waiting for my dad at Sam’s Club! It was not only cute, but it was also enlightening. This is a tale that will stay with you for a while because the lessons in this book are priceless. This was an amazing romance and coming-of-age story!

Continue reading “ARC Review: That Thing We Call a Heart by Sheba Karim”

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Double Mini-Reviews of Two New Contemporary Favorites!: The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett & When Dimple Met Rishi

Hi guys! Happy Friday!! YA Contemporary is one of my favorite genres, and I love it so much because it is very easy to relate with the characters’ modern struggles. Today I am reviewing two novels–The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti and When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon–which I read earlier this summer and loved really much! I hope you these reviews and love the books as much as I did!


About The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett25546710

Hawthorn wasn’t trying to insert herself into a missing person’s investigation. Or maybe she was. But that’s only because Lizzie Lovett’s disappearance is the one fascinating mystery their sleepy town has ever had. Bad things don’t happen to popular girls like Lizzie Lovett, and Hawthorn is convinced she’ll turn up at any moment-which means the time for speculation is now.

So Hawthorn comes up with her own theory for Lizzie’s disappearance.  A theory way too absurd to take seriously…at first. The more Hawthorn talks, the more she believes. And what better way to collect evidence than to immerse herself in Lizzie’s life? Like getting a job at the diner where Lizzie worked and hanging out with Lizzie’s boyfriend. After all, it’s not as if he killed her-or did he?

Told with a unique voice that is both hilarious and heart-wrenching, Hawthorn’s quest for proof may uncover the greatest truth is within herself.

Goodreads


A 5 Star

I seriously love this book. It definitely is going to be one of my favorite reads of 2017 because it was so beautiful! I just could not put it down. I can see why so many people raved about this when it released at the beginning of the year! It’s just that amazing! Sedoti has an amazing gift for crafting a main character’s voice and making it unique, flawed, and realistic. I loved the storyline and I could relate so much to Hawthorne’s inner emotions and feelings. Chelsea Sedoti is definitely an author I am going to keep track of, especially with As You Wish coming out in January of next year.

This book is a new favorite because of one word: Hawthorn. Hawthorn is pretty much the whole reason why I love this book. She is one of the most relatable characters for me ever. I was frequently on the verge of tears because I knew her feelings of not belonging, of not being understood, of having a different viewpoint of the world. Although I didn’t go through the trials like she did, she was so easy to connect to. Her voice was so unique and so deep and so emotional that I want to be her friend. We both connect so well, and that’s why she’s one of my favorite narrators!

As it progressed, especially more towards the 2/3 mark of the book, it lost its original spark. I got just a bit bored and a bit confused at what was going on, but I still loved the story. It’s just like a pristine white cloth: There’s that one small stain that you could never remove. Regardless, it is still one you will always use! This book will still hold a dear place in my heart because of Hawthorn’s unique personality and voice. The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett is such a memorable novel that will still with you for a while.


About When Dimple Met Rishi28458598

A New York Times bestseller

Dimple Shah has it all figured out. With graduation behind her, she’s more than ready for a break from her family, from Mamma’s inexplicable obsession with her finding the “Ideal Indian Husband.” Ugh. Dimple knows they must respect her principles on some level, though. If they truly believed she needed a husband right now, they wouldn’t have paid for her to attend a summer program for aspiring web developers…right?

Rishi Patel is a hopeless romantic. So when his parents tell him that his future wife will be attending the same summer program as him—wherein he’ll have to woo her—he’s totally on board. Because as silly as it sounds to most people in his life, Rishi wants to be arranged, believes in the power of tradition, stability, and being a part of something much bigger than himself.

The Shahs and Patels didn’t mean to start turning the wheels on this “suggested arrangement” so early in their children’s lives, but when they noticed them both gravitate toward the same summer program, they figured, Why not?

Dimple and Rishi may think they have each other figured out. But when opposites clash, love works hard to prove itself in the most unexpected ways.

Goodreads


Oh my goodness, this was such an amazingly cute read! It literally broke the record for the most times I laughed in a book. I wasn’t even 25% done and I laughed really hard 5 times! This is definitely one of the best romances I have ever read, possibly even the best! I really couldn’t put it down because it was just really good. I had the pleasure of meeting Sandhya in person at her signing in Nashville, and I am so glad I got to meet her because she blew me away with this book. This needs to be a movie! I see so many scenes play out as actual movie scenes! I would definitely watch it 10 times!

This book is a new favorite because of the romance! Menon cleverly combined humor, stereotype-defying characters, and slow-burn romance to create one of the most unforgettable development of one of the cutest OTPs in YA fiction. What got me was the scene where Dimple threw her iced coffee at Rishi (who was joking) when he just suddenly came up to her and said, “Hey future wife, I can’t wait to love you forever.” (Not exact words, but you get the point.) I laughed so hard. Seriously, it’s just that amazing. Sandhya Menon is an author that I’m going to be keeping track of now (which means that I need an ARC of From Twinkle, With Love soon!)

Now, I did lose a little interest as the book headed into the middle and the end. Once it got into parts where other romances came into play (I cannot spoil who likes who) it got a bit confusing for me. But you all know that feeling. It’s like watching a movie that super amazing and of course you’ll lose a bit of that spark as you go on. Still regardless, When Dimple Met Rishi is a book that I will recommend to anyone! It will make you laugh, cry, and go “aww”- the perfect combination for the perfect rom-com!


Happy Reading!

+ J.M.J.

~ Kester

Do you have any thoughts or questions?

Comment below, or find me in one of my social media pages, and let’s chat!

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Exclusive Interview with Sci-Fi Author Mary Fan on Her Newest Book Starswept!

Hi guys! Earlier this Summer, I had the wonderful opportunity to review Starswept by Mary Fan, which releases TOMORROW! I loved it so much, and you can see my review of it here! Today I have the amazing opportunity to interview Mary Fan on the blog here, and I’m so excited to share it with you. I hope you enjoy!


About Starswepta0258-starswept-8002bcover2breveal2band2bpromotional

Some melodies reach across the stars.

In 2157, the Adryil—an advanced race of telepathic humanoids—contacted Earth. A century later, 15-year-old violist Iris Lei considers herself lucky to attend Papilio, a prestigious performing arts school powered by their technology. Born penniless, Iris’s one shot at a better life is to attract an Adryil patron. But only the best get hired, and competition is fierce.

A sudden encounter with an Adryil boy upends her world. Iris longs to learn about him and his faraway realm, but after the authorities arrest him for trespassing, the only evidence she has of his existence is the mysterious alien device he slipped to her.

When she starts hearing his voice in her head, she wonders if her world of backstabbing artists and pressure for perfection is driving her insane. Then, she discovers that her visions of him are real—by way of telepathy—and soon finds herself lost in the kind of impossible love she depicts in her music.

But even as their bond deepens, Iris realizes that he’s hiding something from her—and it’s dangerous. Her quest for answers leads her past her sheltered world to a strange planet lightyears away, where she uncovers secrets about Earth’s alien allies that shatter everything she knows.

Goodreads


Mary Fan

1. Why do you love writing? When did you first have a love for writing, and how was it formed?

Quite simply, I love writing because I love stories, and writing is my vehicle for bringing them to life. I’ve always been a huge reader, and even in elementary school, I was always making up my own stories and creating my own books out of construction paper and glue. It was around seventh grade that I started trying to write full-length books. It started out as being just for fun, but the more I wrote, the more I wanted to get good at it. Every kid has their after-school hobbies, and mine was writing stories.

Sometime around junior year, though, I stopped. I think it was for a variety of reasons… partly because I was feeling discouraged (I’d been rejected from a bunch of writing programs), and partly because I was discovering my love of music theory and composition (I’d been an instrumentalist since I was a toddler, but never really appreciated composition until then). So I set aside the writing for several years while I studied music in college. Then after college, I picked it up again… and I’ve been going ever since!

2. What are your favorite books, genres, and authors? Which ones have impacted you and your writing style the most?

Oof, this is always a tough one! Asking me to name my favorite books is like asking me to name my friends… I never want to list them all because I’m afraid I’ll leave one out and feel bad later! I will say, though, that my favorite genres have always been sci-fi and fantasy. I just love out-of-this-world tales. I tend to lean a bit more toward sci-fi, and I think that’s because I’m just more partial toward the aesthetics of futuristic technology and outer space (though I do love castles and magic as well!). I can trace my love of sci-fi back to Jack Williamson’s Legion of Space, which I discovered around seventh grade. I then fell down a rabbit hole of classic sci-fi—Asimov, Bova, Bradbury, Pohl, etc. Come to think of it, I think my tween obsession with reading old-school sci-fi led to my writing habit… the first manuscript I completed (a silly story about Star Trek-style space explorers battling evil aliens) was a space opera. So I think it’s safe to say those had a huge impact on my writing.

3. What do you do when you’re not writing? Is writing a part-time or full-time job?

I currently work a full-time day job in financial marketing, and I treat writing as my second job. I give myself a schedule and deadlines and everything—I’m my own tough boss haha. Of course, one can’t be working all the time—even when that work is also fun. I also love traveling—both around the world and within the United States. There are so, so many places I want to go! And, of course, I love going to live performances—operas, ballets, Broadway shows, rock concerts, circuses…

Continue reading “Exclusive Interview with Sci-Fi Author Mary Fan on Her Newest Book Starswept!”

The Epic Crush of Genie Lo Blog Tour: Exclusive Interview with F. C. Yee!

Hi guys! Happy Thursday! Today I am so happy to be on the blog tour for a book that I am so excited to read: The Epic Crush of Genie Lo by F. C. Yee! This book sounds super awesome and I really hope to read it soon! What I’m really excited for is that I have the special opportunity to have F. C. on the blog with us, so please give him your warmest welcomes!

GENIE LO


About the Book:30116958

Title: THE EPIC CRUSH OF GENIE LO

Author: F.C. Yee

Pub. Date: August 8, 2017

Publisher: Amulet Books

Pages: 336

Formats: Hardcover, eBook

Find it: AmazonBarnes&NobleiBooksTBDGoodreads

Synopsis: The struggle to get into a top-tier college consumes sixteen-year-old Genie Lo’s every waking thought. But when her sleepy Bay Area town comes under siege from hell-spawn straight out of Chinese folklore, her priorities are suddenly and forcefully rearranged.

Her only guide to the demonic chaos breaking out around her is Quentin Sun, a beguiling, maddening new transfer student from overseas. Quentin assures Genie she is strong enough to fight these monsters, for she unknowingly harbors an inner power that can level the very gates of Heaven.

Genie will have to dig deep within herself to summon the otherworldly strength that Quentin keeps talking about. But as she does, she finds the secret of her true nature is entwined with his, in a way she could never have imagined…


About F.C: F.C.

C. Yee grew up in New Jersey and went to school in New England, but has called the San Francisco Bay Area home ever since he beat a friend at a board game and shouted “That’s how we do it in NorCal, baby!” Outside of writing, he practices capoeira, a Brazilian form of martial arts, and has a day job mostly involving spreadsheets.

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads | Instagram


F. C. Yee

1. Your debut YA novel The Epic Crush of Genie Lo follows Genie as she fights demons from Chinese folklore when they invade her hometown of San Francisco as she tries to finish her homework and get into her dream college. Did you have to do any research as you incorporated Chinese folklore into your novel? What are some of your favorite tales you have come across?

30116958I had to do quite a bit of research! Journey to the West, the Chinese classic this book draws from, has inspired so many adaptations that I knew I could be inadvertently tapping a secondary source unless I was careful. So I studied an abridged and an unabridged translation of the original work. From there on I wrote my adaptation, so if I’ve altered the portrayal of any elements for good or bad, at least they’re my own alterations.

One of my favorite tales comes at the end of Journey to the West, where Sun Wukong’s traveling band have defeated all their tough enemies and just need to cross a river. They end up getting dunked, simply to make the number of their challenges add up to eighty-one, which was numerologically important to the original story. Because, you know, why not?

2. Would you say that you are more like Genie or Quentin? Were any of their characteristics or experiences based off you or what you’ve gone through?

More like Genie, by far. Internally, I have a tough time letting go of the bad things that happen in life, so a lot of the time I’m motivated to make sure they never happen again. Genie’s frustrations in standing out academically is pretty close to what I felt at her age. That’s a far cry from the more easygoing Quentin.

 3. I hear that Genie Lo is full of comedy, and I love a book that can make me laugh out loud! Would you consider yourself to be a jokester, and what would you say is your most hilarious moment?

I’m not much of a joker in my day-to-day; I leave that mostly in my writing since I used to edit my college’s humor magazine. The most hilarious moment I can remember off the top of my head was when I’d first moved to San Francisco and was checking out a very small standup comedy open mic. A performer started to talk about how silly the weekend afternoon movies on the SciFi (Syfy?) channel are, and began explaining the premise of one called “Rock Monster.”

I’d seen Rock Monster though, and began to laugh uncontrollably before he got to his joke. The performer was definitely cool about it since it was a casual setting, but in true standup tradition, he was obligated to make fun of me for drawing attention. It just made me laugh harder until the rest of the audience was also laughing and making fun of me. A good time was had by all.

4. Since your novel features an all Asian cast, why do you believe it’s important to accurately portray racially diverse characters and the struggles that they go through in YA fiction?

This is pretty simple- it’s important because people of all different races and experiences are worth reading about, and it would be a lie to pretend otherwise. Authors of all different races and experiences are worth reading, and it would be a lie to pretend otherwise.

5. As a debut author, what is one thing you wished someone would have told you before you started writing and publishing?F.C.

I wished someone would have told me that while figuring out how to make a scene, plot element, or character as good as possible is important, it’s also equally important to ask yourself why it’s there in the first place.

6. What are some of your favorite things about San Francisco, especially considering that you set your book in your hometown? If I were to visit the Bay Area, what are some things that I must do during my stay?

The food comes to mind. San Francisco has too many great restaurants to name, so you basically can’t go wrong by standing in the longest line. Yeah there’s waits, and no, not everyone thinks they’re worth it, but the end goal is usually pretty good on an absolute scale.

I’d recommend that after you hit the sights, you take a walk through North Beach without a destination in mind. It’s a pretty and relaxing way to unwind.

7. Is the title a pun, and if so, was it intended? (I really think it is!) How did you come up with it?

It is! The team at Abrams suggested it. I was told “wait until you see it with the cover graphic,” so I did, and then I was absolutely blown away!

Thank you so much, F.C., for coming onto the blog! It was such a great pleasure having you!


Giveaway Details:

5 winners will receive Genie Lo prize packs—complete with a finished copy of the book and a special Genie Lo horoscope (that doubles as a bookmark!), US Only.

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Don’t forget to check out these amazing tour stops as well!

Tour Schedule:

Week One:

7/31/2017- Wandering Bark Books– Guest Post

8/1/2017- Dani Reviews Things– Review

8/2/2017- Bookwyrming Thoughts– Interview

8/3/2017- NovelKnight– Review

8/4/2017- Tales of the Ravenous Reader– Interview

Week Two:

8/7/2017- Arctic Books– Review

8/8/2017- A Dream Within A Dream– Excerpt

8/9/2017- Book-Keeping– Review

8/10/2017- LILbooKlovers– Interview

8/11/2017- Nerdophiles – Review


Happy Reading!

+ J.M.J.

~ Kester

Are you excited for The Epic Crush of Genie Lo? What are your thoughts?

Comment below, or find me in one of my social media pages, and let’s chat!

Email| Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads | Instagram | Bloglovin

Summer of Authors #14: Exclusive Interview with Sheba Karim, Author of That Thing We Call a Heart!

Hi guys! Today I’m leaving my summer engineering camp, and I’m so nostalgic right now! These past few days have been super fun (I hope, I’m writing this two weeks ahead.) To celebrate the end of camp (and the end of summer approaching so soon!), today I’m welcoming Sheba Karim, author of That Thing We Call a Heart (which I really loved), on our blog today! I met Sheba- who is a local author in Nashville- twice, the first at the SE-YA Book Fest and the second at Sandhya Menon’s signing and launch event for When Dimple Met Rishi! I was so glad to win an ARC of TTWCaH and I’m so glad to have the chance to interview Sheba! Enjoy!


About That Thing We Call a Heart25752164

Shabnam Qureshi is a funny, imaginative Pakistani-American teen attending a tony private school in suburban New Jersey. When her feisty best friend, Farah, starts wearing the headscarf without even consulting her, it begins to unravel their friendship. After hooking up with the most racist boy in school and telling a huge lie about a tragedy that happened to her family during the Partition of India in 1947, Shabnam is ready for high school to end. She faces a summer of boredom and regret, but she has a plan: Get through the summer. Get to college. Don’t look back. Begin anew.

Everything changes when she meets Jamie, who scores her a job at his aunt’s pie shack, and meets her there every afternoon. Shabnam begins to see Jamie and herself like the rose and the nightingale of classic Urdu poetry, which, according to her father, is the ultimate language of desire. Jamie finds Shabnam fascinating—her curls, her culture, her awkwardness. Shabnam finds herself falling in love, but Farah finds Jamie worrying.

With Farah’s help, Shabnam uncovers the truth about Jamie, about herself, and what really happened during Partition. As she rebuilds her friendship with Farah and grows closer to her parents, Shabnam learns powerful lessons about the importance of love, in all of its forms.

Featuring complex, Muslim-American characters who defy conventional stereotypes and set against a backdrop of Radiohead’s music and the evocative metaphors of Urdu poetry, THAT THING WE CALL A HEART is a honest, moving story of a young woman’s explorations of first love, sexuality, desire, self-worth, her relationship with her parents, the value of friendship, and what it means to be true.

Goodreads

Amazon | Barnes & Noble


Sheba Karim

1. Why do you love writing? When did you first have a love for writing, and how was it formed?

When I was young, my love for reading prompted me to try to create my own worlds and stories, and I began writing.  I loved writing, and still do, because it’s such a powerful and expressive use of the imagination.

2. What are your favorite books, genres, and authors? Which ones have impacted you and your writing style the most?

Growing up, I loved British lit, Austen, the Brontes, E.M. Forster.  I also loved a lot of seminal YA literature like The Chocolate Wars and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.  In college and beyond, I started reading a lot of South Asian and diaspora fiction, Salman Rushdie, Jhumpa Lahiri, Rohinton Mistry. I read YA and lit fiction pretty broadly now, though I don’t have as much time to read as I’d like.  I’m always inspired by literature that skillfully incorporates humor.

3. What do you do when you’re not writing? Is writing a part-time or full-time job?

I write full time.  When I’m not writing, I’m playing with my daughter, cooking, reading or catching up with a show on Netflix.

Continue reading “Summer of Authors #14: Exclusive Interview with Sheba Karim, Author of That Thing We Call a Heart!”

Summer of Authors #10: Exclusive Interview with Pintip Dunn!

Hi guys! Last month, I had the wonderful opportunity to read and review Girl on the Verge by Pintip Dunn (in which you can find the review here!) and I loved it. Definitely one of the best thrillers I’ve read! I know have the amazing honor to welcome Pintip today on our blog, so I hope you’ll enjoy this special interview!


About Girl on the Verge31428017

From the author of The Darkest Lie comes a compelling, provocative story for fans of I Was Here and Vanishing Girls, about a high school senior straddling two worlds, unsure how she fits in either—and the journey of self-discovery that leads her to surprising truths.

In her small Kansas town, at her predominantly white school, Kanchana doesn’t look like anyone else. But at home, her Thai grandmother chides her for being too westernized. Only through the clothing Kan designs in secret can she find a way to fuse both cultures into something distinctly her own.

When her mother agrees to provide a home for a teenage girl named Shelly, Kan sees a chance to prove herself useful. Making Shelly feel comfortable is easy at first—her new friend is eager to please, embraces the family’s Thai traditions, and clearly looks up to Kan. Perhaps too much. Shelly seems to want everything Kanchana has, even the blond, blue-eyed boy she has a crush on. As Kan’s growing discomfort compels her to investigate Shelly’s past, she’s shocked to find how much it intersects with her own—and just how far Shelly will go to belong…

Goodreads

Learn more at http://www.pintipdunn.com/gotv/

Or buy it below!

Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Kobo   iTunes   Book Depository   Books-A-Million


Pintip Dunn

1. Why do you love writing? When did you first have a love for writing, and how was it formed?

I love writing because I feel like my truest self when I write. I’ve wanted to be an author ever since I was six years old, but I didn’t write my first book until the first year after college (which was many years ago!) 

2. What are your favorite books, genres, and authors? Which ones have impacted you and your writing style the most?

I love all books and will read anything, but I have a particular affinity for young adult and romance. I’m a big fan of Suzanne Collins, Stephenie Meyer, Gillian Flynn, Orson Scott Card, Kristan Higgins, and of course, JK Rowling. I could go on, but those authors have written my favorite books. Reading Suzanne Collins’ books taught me the most about the craft of writing, and Stephenie Meyer’s The Host showed me the kind of books I want to write. 

3. What do you do when you’re not writing? Is writing a part-time or full-time job?

I have three kids, which is the equivalent of a full-time job! I used to be a lawyer, but I no longer practice.  31428017

4. Your newest book Girl on the Verge just released on June 27th, and it revolves around Kan, a Thai-American girl living in a small town in Kansas, but she feels like she’s stuck between the worlds of her Thai ancestry and her surrounding American culture. Are there any parallels between you and Kan? Were any of her experiences and feelings based off of any you’ve had before?

Absolutely. I was a Thai-American girl who grew up in a small town in Kansas, so a lot of Kan’s feelings of not belonging were derived from my own experiences. At the same time, however, I want to emphasize that the feeling is where the similarity ends. Kan’s story is wholly fictional and was born entirely in my imagination! 

Continue reading “Summer of Authors #10: Exclusive Interview with Pintip Dunn!”