Exclusive Interview with Melissa Ostrom, YA Debut Author of “The Beloved Wild”

Hi guys! Today on the blog, I am hosting one of the kindest and most supportive authors I have ever met, Melissa Ostrom. Melissa is the author of the YA historical fiction novel The Beloved Wild, which I loved and you can see why in my review here, and I am very honored to have her on my blog to talk to us about her debut novel! I hope you enjoy this interview, and please check out The Beloved Wild! (By the way, Ruta Sepetys blurbed it, in case you didn’t know.)


About the BookThe Beloved Wild

Harriet Winter is the eldest daughter in a farming family in New Hampshire, 1807. Her neighbor is Daniel Long, who runs his family’s farm on his own after the death of his parents. Harriet’s mother sees Daniel as a good match, but Harriet isn’t so sure she wants someone else to choose her path—in love and in life.

When her brother decides to strike out for the Genesee Valley in Western New York, Harriet decides to go with him—disguised as a boy. Their journey includes sickness, uninvited guests, and difficult emotional terrain as Harriet comes of age, realizes what she wants, and accepts who she’s loved all along.

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1. Your YA historical fiction debut The Beloved Wild, which released in March from Feiwel & Friends, follows Harriet Winter as she disguises herself as a boy to venture into the Genesee Valley as she overcomes prejudice, nature, and eventually love. As a local resident, what do you love most about living in that region? How did the valley allure you to use it as the setting of your debut?

I’m originally from Chautauqua County. The teaching position at Kendall High School brought me to this area, and I fell in love with its gentle landscape—the sweeping orchards, Lake Ontario, the cultivated fields that alternate with woodlands, and the historical features, like the Erie Canal and cobblestone houses. I felt like a pioneer, traveling to a new place and making it my home. The families of my students warmly welcomed me. Writing Harriet’s story (and recognizing the significant role the Genesee Valley played in our country’s initial wave of westward expansion) became a way for me to show my gratitude for that welcome and my appreciation for this location.

2. The Age of the American Frontier is a time period that is often overlooked in historical fiction. How did you first stumble upon the exodus of New Englanders flocking to the uncharted wilderness of New York? What are some of the most interesting things you learned from your research?

I’m fortunate to have some dear friends who happen to know a lot about our local history. Three in particular—Diane Palmer, Adrienne Kirby, and Sharon Root—shared significant stories about the early pioneers (to whom these women can trace their own ancestries!), and those tales definitely stirred my interest. My friends also shared family memorabilia, access to the archives of the Orleans County Chapter of the DAR, and powerful reading materials, like the settlers’ reminisces, compiled by Arad Thomas. These firsthand pioneer accounts proved quite useful and remarkable. Most of the early settlers were young—just teenagers with little money and few tools—but they possessed a great deal of gumption. They worked hard to eke clearings out of the wilderness and faced incredible trials while starting their farms. Their stories inspired me. I remember reading about one young man who had nothing but the clothes on his back and an axe in his hand when he broached the wilds of his purchased lot of land. He started with practically nothing and yet made something of himself. Amazing.

3. What would be your dream adventure? Where would you go and what would you do?

Oh, I’d like to travel around our country and visit other parts of the world. But lately I’ve been thinking about walking the length of the Erie Canal—simply packing a backpack and taking off for a while, breaking up the hike with stays in inns and visits to the waterway towns. I love going for long walks and usually cover around eight miles a day. It’d be fun to set out—and just keep going! My family (when my kids get a little older) would probably enjoy this adventure, too. The Beloved Wild

4. Before you wrote The Beloved Wild, you wrote many short stories for various journals. Could you describe to us the transition you made from writing short stories to writing a full-length novel? What are the specific benefits and challenges of creating a short story versus drafting a novel?

Actually, about nine years ago when I initially decided to try fiction writing, I started with a novel, not short fiction. The novel became the first in a series of four. I finished the entire quartet before shopping around the first book. When querying this piece didn’t win me an agent, I set aside all four and got to work on another novel (a standalone). Concurrently, I began to craft short fiction.

My initial reasoning behind the short-fiction enterprise was I need to beef up my credentials! I just held a couple of degrees in English lit and my teaching certification. I couldn’t mention publications, conferences, retreats, or even an MFA in a query letter because I hadn’t accomplished any of these things. Publishing short stories would rectify that, I figured. And I have managed to find homes in literary journals for many of my stories.

But something else (something more wonderful) happened as a result of this foray into short fiction: my writing skills improved. Perhaps due to their sparer frame, stories (those admirable ones written by others and the ones I endeavor to create) showcase precise language and an attention to detail. A word must earn its place—or out it goes.

Continue reading “Exclusive Interview with Melissa Ostrom, YA Debut Author of “The Beloved Wild””

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ARC Review: The Beloved Wild by Melissa Ostrom — A Novel about Overcoming Prejudices and Obstacles and Finding Adventure and Oneself

Hi guys! I hope you are having an awesome week! I know I am, especially since it’s Spring Break and Holy Week this week. Today I am at Ole Miss for a college visit (Hotty Toddy!), so I’m really looking forward to touring and visiting the campus. I usually do not post on Wednesdays, but since I have so many books to review that are releasing in the upcoming months, I’m going to post the occasional Wednesday post to get all my reviews in on time. Yesterday, The Beloved Wild by Melissa Ostrom just released, which is an amazing YA historical fiction debut that blew me away. Melissa is one of the most supportive and kind authors I’ve met online, so I’m super excited to be sharing my review of her debut to y’all today. Hope you enjoy!


About the BookThe Beloved Wild

Harriet Winter is the eldest daughter in a farming family in New Hampshire, 1807. Her neighbor is Daniel Long, who runs his family’s farm on his own after the death of his parents. Harriet’s mother sees Daniel as a good match, but Harriet isn’t so sure she wants someone else to choose her path—in love and in life.

When her brother decides to strike out for the Genesee Valley in Western New York, Harriet decides to go with him—disguised as a boy. Their journey includes sickness, uninvited guests, and difficult emotional terrain as Harriet comes of age, realizes what she wants, and accepts who she’s loved all along.

Goodreads

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4 Stars

Disclaimer: Thanks so much to Macmillan’s Children’s Publishing Group and my publicity contact there for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. This will not affect my review in any way.

Before I begin this review, I have two things to point out. The first one is that Ruta Sepetys (yes, THE Ruta Sepetys, my favorite author in the entire world) blurbed this book, which is awesome and well-deserved. The second one is that Melissa is one of the kindest and most supportive authors I have ever met online, and she has said and done so many things for me that has warmed my heart greatly. But it was actually through Twitter where I began to rave about The Beloved Wild when we first began to communicate.

Now onto why I love The Beloved Wild so much!

The Beloved Wild is a stark yet gripping account of the prejudices women had to endure in the 19th century, a time before the Industrial Revolution prompted new reforms and changes. It is YA historical fiction and literature at its finest. A great novel is one that enlightens you and influences your viewpoint, and I am proud to consider Ostrom’s debut novel as one. The Beloved Wild teaches readers how to embrace who they are and find their inner strength when encountering the toughest of obstacles. It has the perfect combination of adventure, romance, family, and friendships that will appeal to many readers and give each of them a memorable experience.

Continue reading “ARC Review: The Beloved Wild by Melissa Ostrom — A Novel about Overcoming Prejudices and Obstacles and Finding Adventure and Oneself”

Exclusive Interview with Amy Trueblood, YA Debut Author of Nothing but Sky!

Hi guys! My Spring Break has finally started, and I am so glad to be off school for a week. I finally have time to catch up on needed reading, blogging, practicing, and studying. I’m still in a bit of shock that this semester is already more than halfway over; it seems like Winter and Spring always flies by so fast because there is so much going on! Speaking of flying by so fast, today I am interview Amy Trueblood, author of the thrilling YA historical fiction debut Nothing but Sky, which I loved and enjoyed so much. Please go check out Amy’s novel, and if you need a reason why to buy it, here’s my review of Nothing but Sky! I hope you enjoy this interview!


About the BookNothing but Sky

Grace Lafferty only feels alive when she’s dangling 500 feet above ground. As a post-World War I wing walker, Grace is determined to get to the World Aviation Expo, proving her team’s worth against flashier competitors and earning a coveted Hollywood contract.

No one’s ever questioned Grace’s ambition until Henry Patton, a mechanic with plenty of scars from the battlefield, joins her barnstorming team. With each new death-defying trick, Henry pushes Grace to consider her reasons for being a daredevil. Annoyed with Henry’s constant interference, and her growing attraction to him, Grace continues to test the powers of the sky.

After one of her risky maneuvers saves a pilot’s life, a Hollywood studio offers Grace a chance to perform at the Expo. She jumps at the opportunity to secure her future. But when a stunt goes wrong, Grace must decide whether Henry, and her life, are worth risking for one final trick.

Nothing but Sky releases tomorrow from Flux Books on March 27th!

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1. Your debut novel Nothing but Sky, which releases on March 27 from Flux Books, follows the story of Grace Lafferty, a post-World War I barnstormer, as she meets a young war mechanic named Henry Patton and attempts to bring herself and her team to the World Aviation Expo to win a Hollywood contract. How did you first stumble upon barnstorming and female wing walkers in the Roaring Twenties? What are some of the most fascinating things you’ve learned about the Prohibition Era?

The idea for the story came from a visit to the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. When I entered the museum, I saw a biplane tethered to the ceiling and went to take a closer look. Next to the plane was a placard with the name, Ethel Dare, and it mentioned she was a barnstormer/wing walker. I was immediately intrigued and wrote her name down in my phone. Later, I would discover through research that she and a handful of other brave women made barnstorming their lives and I knew I had to learn more.

The 1920s was a transformative time for women. While many look back on history and see them earning the right to vote in 1920, women would continue to battle for rights despite this victory. As you read through history, you see women pushing back against societal norms. This is demonstrated through both language and the changing length of hemlines. All subtle ways in which women at that time began to rebel.

2. Henry struggles and tries to cope with his PTSD after his deployment in the Great War throughout the novel. Why do you believe it is important to accurately portray mental illness in Young Adult fiction?

Our life experiences form who we are as a person. I wanted to specifically contrast Henry’s life before the war to the man he became after and how those experiences changed who he was as a human. For me, everyone has a backstory, A reason for why they make certain choices. I think it’s important in Young Adult fiction to not just show a character struggling, but to get of the root of the reason why. Sometimes you see a villain just as a villain. But a good writer will show you how that character got to that point. It goes back to the idea that we shouldn’t judge people without understanding their story.

Nothing but Sky3. Since Grace performs death-defying stunts every time she barnstorms, what would you say has been one of the riskiest decisions or actions you’ve taken in your life?

I once had a boss who was a real bully. She would scream and yell and throw things. No one would do anything about her behavior. One day, she literally picked up a piece of office equipment and threw it across the room almost hitting a colleague. That was the end of the line for me. I went toe-to-toe with her and called her out even though I knew she’d probably fire me. The president of the company got wind of the altercation and took care of the problem, but in those moments with that boss I was terrified.

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ARC Review: Blood and Sand by C. V. Wyk

Hi guys! I hope you all had a wonderful Christmas full of family, friends, and gifts!


About the BookBlood and Sand

FORGED IN BATTLE…
FROM THE DUST OF THE ARENA…
A LEGEND WILL RISE

The action-packed tale of a 17-year-old warrior princess and a handsome gladiator who dared take on the Roman Republic―and gave rise to the legend of Spartacus…

For teens who love strong female protagonists in their fantasy and historical fiction, Blood and Sand is a stirring, yet poignant tale of two slaves who dared take on an empire by talented debut author C. V. Wyk.

Roma Victrix. The Republic of Rome is on a relentless march to create an empire―an empire built on the backs of the conquered, brought back to Rome as slaves.

Attia was once destined to rule as the queen and swordmaiden of Thrace, the greatest warrior kingdom the world had seen since Sparta. Now she is a slave, given to Xanthus, the Champion of Rome, as a sign of his master’s favor. Enslaved as a child, Xanthus is the preeminent gladiator of his generation.

Against all odds, Attia and Xanthus form a tentative bond. A bond that will spark a rebellion. A rebellion that threatens to bring the Roman Republic to its end―and gives rise to the legend of Spartacus…

The story continues in Fire and Ash, coming in 2019 from Tor Teen.

Goodreads


3 Stars

Disclaimer: I received a free signed ARC of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. This will not affect my review in any way.

I had very high expectations for this book because of many reasons: the hype surrounding the novel, the story being set in the Roman Empire (Ancient Rome??? You know I can’t turn that down!), a female warrior being Spartacus, so many action scenes. I was preparing myself to be blown away. Unfortunately, I had the same feelings as I did when I read Stalking Jack the Ripper: I felt so disconnected from the characters and the storyline because the writing style did not draw me in as much as I had hoped to be.

Continue reading “ARC Review: Blood and Sand by C. V. Wyk”