Book Review: Lost on the Water by D. G. Driver — A Creepy Ghost Story Perfect for the Summertime or around a Campfire

Hi guys! Today is the last day of August, and to celebrate, I am sharing with you all a review of a spooky summertime read. A month ago, I read Lost on the Water by D. G. Driver, a local author who not only lives in Tennessee but set her latest novel there as well. It’s definitely a quick and easy read, yet it will get your heart pounding! I hope you enjoy!


About the BookLost on the Water

One girl’s daring adventure turns into a long frightful night lost on the water.

Against her wishes, Dannie has to leave the California beach behind to spend the summer with her grandma in rural Tennessee. Things look up when a group of local boys invite her on an overnight kayaking trip. When her grandma refuses to let her go, Dannie finds an old rowboat hidden behind the shed and sneaks off to catch up to her new friends. It seems like a simple solution… until everything goes wrong.

Dannie soon discovers this lake is more than just vast. It’s full of danger, family secrets, and ghosts.

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4 StarsDisclaimer: I received a free electronic copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. This will not affect my review in any way.

Honestly, I’m not the biggest fan of horror and ghost stories. While I think they’re really interesting, sometimes I just get too creeped out by movie trailers or book synopses. I did love D. G. Driver’s The Juniper Sawfeather Trilogy, so when she reached out to me about her latest novel—a ghost set in my home state of Tennessee—I could not resist. Lost on the Water is a creepy and chilling tale filled with secrets, mystery, and intrigue. It is a very quick and easy read that will suck you in after just a few pages. The story might seem a bit innocent at first, but be warned, there’s more secrets and scares than meets the eye.

While I am not an expert in ghost stories, I can say with certainty that a good one must be able to spook you. Lost on the Water did send many chills down my spine as it creeped me out. It is one of those stories that is perfect to narrate around a campfire in the middle of the night or to read in your bed while staying up past your bedtime. I finished Lost on the Water in just a few sittings, and I found myself intrigued and mystified by the possibility of a ghost plaguing Dannie and Center Hill Lake from the start. This book will get your heart pounding, your blood pumping, and your senses prickling.

I think the part that I enjoyed the most was the whole setting. As much as I love reading books by local authors, what’s even better is reading books set in my beloved home state of Tennessee. Lost on the Water takes place in the quiet town of Smithville (which is real and I have passed by it), home to Center Hill Lake, which may or may not be haunted. To see all of the references to Tennessee life and culture made me so happy—small details like the freeway being referred to as an “interstate” and people drinking really really sweet tea filled me with joy. Certainly, the author got Tennessee life in a small town right. In addition, she truly transports her readers into nature, making them feel as if they were paddling on the vast lake or stumbling through a dark forest. Driver’s prose was very well-written, and I commend her greatly for that.

Lost on the Water is a great read for both the summer and the fall. It’s a spooky tale that is one thrill of a ride—a journey that will take on the waters of a lake that may seem serene but is haunted by the memory (or possibly more than that) of a terrible accident. Dannie’s adventure will have readers feeling goosebumps and wanting more after each chapter.


About the AuthorSAMSUNG

D. G. Driver is an optimist at heart, and that’s why she likes to write books about young people who strive to make a difference in the world. From her teen environmentalist in The Juniper Sawfeather Trilogy, a young girl teaching her friends autism acceptance and to stop bullying people with special needs in No One Needed to Know, a princess who desires to be more than a pampered prize for a prince in The Royal Deal, to a boy who learns that being genuine and chivalrous are the ways to win a girl’s heart in Passing Notes, Driver hopes to write characters that you’ll want to root for. When she’s not writing, she is a teacher in an inclusive child development center in Nashville, and she can often be found strutting the stage in a local musical theater production.

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Happy Reading!

+ J.M.J.

~ Kester

Have you read Lost on the Water? Do you like ghost stories?

Comment below, or find me in one of my social media pages, and let’s chat!

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Book Review: The Gravedigger’s Son by Patrick Moody — A Heart-Pounding yet Heartwarming MG Horror Novel Full of Empathy and Imagination

Hi guys! Today is my first day of school, and I am really stoked for senior year! It’s going to be crazy and stressful yet fun and exciting, and I am resolving to enjoy each and every day to the fullest (plus read some amazing books along the way). Today’s review is a Middle Grade horror novel (yes, MG and horror!) by Patrick Moody called The Gravedigger’s Son. It’s really spooky yet heartwarming, and you can see why I loved it so much in my review! I hope you enjoy it!


About the BookThe Gravedigger's Son

“A Digger must not refuse a request from the Dead.” —Rule Five of the Gravedigger’s Code

Ian Fossor is last in a long line of Gravediggers. It’s his family’s job to bury the dead and then, when Called by the dearly departed, to help settle the worries that linger beyond the grave so spirits can find peace in the Beyond.

But Ian doesn’t want to help the dead—he wants to be a Healer and help the living. Such a wish is, of course, selfish and impossible. Fossors are Gravediggers. So he reluctantly continues his training under the careful watch of his undead mentor, hoping every day that he’s never Called and carefully avoiding the path that leads into the forbidden woods bordering the cemetery.

Just as Ian’s friend, Fiona, convinces him to talk to his father, they’re lured into the woods by a risen corpse that doesn’t want to play by the rules. There, the two are captured by a coven of Weavers, dark magic witches who want only two thing—to escape the murky woods where they’ve been banished, and to raise the dead and shift the balance of power back to themselves.

Only Ian can stop them. With a little help from his friends. And his long-dead ancestors.

Equal parts spooky and melancholy, funny and heartfelt, The Gravedigger’s Son is a gorgeous debut that will long sit beside Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book and Jonathan Auxier’s The Night Gardener.

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4 Stars

Disclaimer: I received a free hardcover copy of this book from the author for review consideration. This will not affect my review in any way.

Middle Grade and horror may not seem like a soluble combination at first, but Patrick Moody masters this mixture in his debut novel The Gravedigger’s Son. The Gravedigger’s Son infuses dark fantasy full of the undead, witches, and magic with a story filled with light, hope, and goodness. I didn’t know what to expect from a MG horror novel (a genre that is very rare), but this book definitely met and even exceeded my expectations. It is one that makes you want to savor each and every page. From the opening pages to the beautiful illustrations, readers will become mesmerized as this heart-pounding yet heartwarming story will capture their imaginations and wrench their emotions.

Throughout The Gravedigger’s Son, Ian is torn between upholding his family’s legacy as a Gravedigger and pursuing his passion for helping the living as a Healer. As he explores both his heritage and himself, readers become driven to be see the good in each person and to understand the struggles behind their motives. The Gravedigger’s Son teaches readers of all ages the true meaning behind the old adage “Hurt people hurt people,” that bad guys are often driven to evil not because they are evil but because they are hurt, insecure, fearful. Moody’s debut novel spreads empathy as he reveals more about the antagonists. I can say that The Gravedigger’s Son truly imprinted that message on my heart and inspired me to see a new side to those who have hurt and persecuted me. This book will touch readers regardless of age or background.

Patrick Moody creates a spooky yet magical world where Gravediggers assist the dead, Healers help the living, and Witches can disrupt the peace between the two worlds. I fell in love with all of the magic and intrigue from the first few chapters. The illustrations, gorgeously crafted by the talented Graham Carter, further make the story come to life. While they may be few in number, their quality will cause readers to stare at them in wonder and become entranced into the scenes they depict. I can say for certain that I fell in love with all of the illustrations to the point where I felt like I was actually in the story. In addition, the characters are very charming, complex, and lovable. Everything about The Gravedigger’s Son is beautifully crafted.

The Gravedigger’s Son may scare you at times, but it will warm and wrench your heart nonetheless. It may not be a horror novel in the style of Stephen King, but it certainly does spook you and sends chills down your spine. With the help of a few beautiful illustrations, Patrick Moody transports readers into a world where the lines between the living and the dead can become blurred at times. He accomplishes this using brilliant storytelling, charming characters, surprising twists, and powerful messages. The Gravedigger’s Son ultimately will help readers to remember to stand up for what is right, to defend your family at all costs, to help people in any way possible, and to continue pursuing your dreams.


About the AuthorPatrick Moody

When he was six years old, Patrick Moody saw The Creature From the Black Lagoon on late-night television, which sparked a life long love of all things horror, fantasy, and science fiction. He also grew up next to a graveyard, which probably helped.

Patrick is the author of numerous short stories, ranging from adult horror to Middle Grade fantasy. His work has appeared in several journals and magazines, and a few have been adapted into audio dramas.

His first novel, The Gravedigger’s Son, illustrated by Graham Carter, will be available August 1, 2017 from Sky Pony Press.

Patrick lives in Connecticut with his girlfriend and their mischievous coven of cats.

When he’s not thinking about zombies, witches, werewolves, and wizards, he’s writing about them.

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Happy Reading!

+ J.M.J.

~ Kester

Have you read The Gravedigger’s Son? Do you like MG horror novels?

Comment below, or find me in one of my social media pages, and let’s chat!

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Exclusive Interview with Patrick Moody, MG Horror Author of The Gravedigger’s Son

Hi guys! To be honest, I have not read that many horror novels in my lifetime. The most recent one was The Lairdbalor by Kathleen Kaufman, and although I wish I had enjoyed that book much more than I actually did, I am really excited for The Gravedigger’s Son by Patrick Moody. I am actually ready to be scared to my bones! Today, I have the wonderful opportunity to interview the book’s amazing author, and I’ve certainly enjoyed writing his questions and reading his answers. I hope you have the chance to check out his novel!


About the BookThe Gravedigger's Son

“A Digger must not refuse a request from the Dead.” —Rule Five of the Gravedigger’s Code

Ian Fossor is last in a long line of Gravediggers. It’s his family’s job to bury the dead and then, when Called by the dearly departed, to help settle the worries that linger beyond the grave so spirits can find peace in the Beyond.

But Ian doesn’t want to help the dead—he wants to be a Healer and help the living. Such a wish is, of course, selfish and impossible. Fossors are Gravediggers. So he reluctantly continues his training under the careful watch of his undead mentor, hoping every day that he’s never Called and carefully avoiding the path that leads into the forbidden woods bordering the cemetery.

Just as Ian’s friend, Fiona, convinces him to talk to his father, they’re lured into the woods by a risen corpse that doesn’t want to play by the rules. There, the two are captured by a coven of Weavers, dark magic witches who want only two thing—to escape the murky woods where they’ve been banished, and to raise the dead and shift the balance of power back to themselves.

Only Ian can stop them. With a little help from his friends. And his long-dead ancestors.

Equal parts spooky and melancholy, funny and heartfelt, The Gravedigger’s Son is a gorgeous debut that will long sit beside Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book and Jonathan Auxier’s The Night Gardener.

Goodreads

Amazon | Barnes &Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound | Book Depository


Patrick Moody Header.png

1. Why do you love writing? When did you first have a love for writing, and how was it formed?

First, thanks so much for hosting me, Kester!

I love writing because I’ve always been a daydreamer. I’ve always had stories in my head, or at least little snippets of stories, thinking up fantastical places and people, heroes and villains, dangerous quests and spooky castles. Growing up, my mind was filled with “what ifs”. I think, in all honesty, that I never really grew out of playing make believe. I love writing because if I didn’t, I wouldn’t be fulfilled creatively.

2. What are your favorite books, genres, and authors? Which ones have impacted you and your writing style the most?

My favorite genres are fantasy and horror. Science Fiction is up there as well, and a bit of magical realism, too. I think the most impactful writer in my childhood was Robert Jordan. My father was a fan of his, and had his entire Wheel of Time series. I remember climbing up onto the bookshelves and staring at those incredible covers, completely spellbound. Aside from Goosebumps and Lloyd Alexander, I never really read for my age group. I jumped right into epic fantasy. Terry Brooks came next, followed by Peter S. Beagle and Ursula K. Leguinn.

Beagle has influenced me more than any other writer. I think The Innkeeper’s Song is the most beautiful fantasy ever written.

As for favorite books, ‘Salem’s Lot by Stephen King & Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury have always been close to my heart. Recent favorites include The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill and The Sorcerer’s House by Gene Wolfe. I’ve also really enjoyed a few short story collections by Kelly Link.

3. What do you do when you’re not writing? Is writing a part-time or full-time job?

When I’m not writing, I’m usually reading. It seems my TBR pile gets bigger every time I turn around. I think it’s growing on its own! Maybe that’ll be my next book?

For me, writing isn’t really a job. It’s a passion. A need. I do have a full time job as a middle school custodian. It’s really great for my writing. Nice and quiet, with plenty of time to think. I write for one hour a day, on my lunch break. I feel that setting a time limit really helps. On my days off, I always tell myself, “Okay, lets get writing. You’ll get so much done!”…Until I turn on the tv or crack open a book. Having the structure of writing at work really helps. Otherwise, I get way too distracted.

4. Your MG debut novel The Gravedigger’s Son tells the tale of Ian Fossor, who feels conflicted between his desire to become a Healer and his family’s lineage as Gravediggers. As he is Called to help the soul of a young boy, he finds himself fighting against a group of witches bent on seeking revenge and power. Would you be a Gravedigger or a Healer? How do you explore the themes of life and death, good and evil, and following your dreams versus your family’s expectations in your novel?

The Gravedigger's SonThat’s a tough one! Gravediggers and Healers both help people, but one helps the Living while the other helps the Dead. I think I’d like to be a Gravedigger, since they deal with a certain amount of magic and mysticism. Healing is noble, but I’d be too worried about messing something up. I was never too good in biology or anatomy class!

Exploring the concept of death can be tricky, especially when writing for a MG audience. In terms of religion, I kept everything utterly vague and set it in a fantasy realm. I also had to do it in a way that wasn’t too bleak (I hope), so I knew that I needed a lot of comic relief. That came in the form of Bertrum, Ian’s grumpy but loving undead tutor. And it comes later with Thatcher Moore, the skeleton who refuses to stay dead. One of the main struggles in Ian’s life is the fact that he lost his mother at a young age, and though he’s growing up in a family that has the power to speak to the Dead, he knows he’ll never be able to reach her…or so he thinks. I liked the idea of having something so important being just out of his reach. It makes for a melancholy character, but a sympathetic one. Ian knows that death is a serious business. There’s a big part of him that really despises the whole notion of it (which is probably true for most of us), but as the story progresses, he discovers that death is far from the end.

Good and evil was also something I wanted to explore, but I knew that I didn’t want to make it so black and white. In the story, Ian comes across a coven of Weavers, or dark magic witches. At first, they seem to be completely evil. Yet as the conflict reaches its climax, Ian realizes that their evil deeds are coming from a place of great pain, and in the case of the younger Weavers, a place of learned ignorance. I never like stories of completely flawless heroes vs. completely evil villains. That’s been done before, and I think it’s (thankfully) becoming a dying trope. Everyone has the capacity to be good and bad. There are a thousand shades of gray. You never know what might drive a good person to do something bad, or a bad person to do something good. We all handle things differently. I wanted to write about characters who struggle with righting past wrongs. Naturally, they all have a lot of emotional distress, their morality is clouded, and that heavy baggage can lead to some pretty drastic action.

Continue reading “Exclusive Interview with Patrick Moody, MG Horror Author of The Gravedigger’s Son”

Review: The Lairdbalor by Kathleen Kaufman — Creepy and Chilling to the Core

Hi guys! If you ever want to watch a scary movie with me, please be warned that your experience will be full of me screaming, recoiling in terror, or pointing out every single mistake that the characters make in an attempt to lessen the severity of all the scares. Did you know I got scared and couldn’t watch the first scene of the new Ghostbusters movie because I didn’t think I could handle the jump scare? Yeah, that was really bad. But horror novels are different for some reason. When I’m reading a novel, I love to feel the chills down my spine and not want to continue on in fear of something bad happening. That’s why I decided to read and review The Lairdbalor by Kathleen Kaufman and give horror novels a try!


About The LairdbalorThe Lairdbalor

“I am the stuff of your nightmares . . . you have been writing my name on the walls of your fear your entire life.”

When seven-year-old Jamie falls down a very long hill, he finds himself trapped in a world of strange creatures, harsh landscapes, and near-perpetual darkness. Lost and confused, Jamie is desperate to get home. The nightmares, fears, and all manner of what-ifs that inhabit this shadow world are unfamiliar to him–all except one: the Lairdbalor, Jamie’s personal nightmare, once relegated to his dreams. In this fantastical land, however, the Lairdbalor and all the fears and nightmares of children are very real.

But Jamie’s nightmare is different. It is the sum total of the anger and anxiety that imprisoned him in his former life, and it threatens to consume and rule the nightmare realm, a place where time passes differently. With each slumber, Jamie finds himself inexorably changed. The farther he travels through this terrifying world, the better he understands the one he left behind.

Crossing genres of folklore, horror, fantasy, and magical realism, The Lairdbalor is about a child, but it’s not meant for children. It’s a story for anyone who lives with anxiety and fear and has ever wondered “what if” and a darkly imaginative meditation on life, death, fear, and the nature of reality.

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Buy The Lairdbalor today!

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3 Stars

Disclaimer: Thanks so much to Turner Publisher for sending me a free physical copy of this book in exchange for an honest review! This will not affect my review in any other way.

To be honest, I’m not much of a horror person. I cannot watch horror movies, but I can with books (since I can control my imagination, haha). I decided to read and review The Lairdbalor because I wanted to try out the genre. As I concluded Kaufman’s debut novel, I feel a bit torn regarding my feelings towards the story. I enjoyed the spooks and the chills I felt as I traveled with Jamie through the nightmare world, but it got weird and perplexing for me from the midpoint. Although I round down my ratings, The Lairdbalor would actually receive a rating of 3.5 from me since it doesn’t exactly deserve either a 3 or a 4. It’s not that bad of a book, but I didn’t enjoy it as much as I had hoped to.

Continue reading “Review: The Lairdbalor by Kathleen Kaufman — Creepy and Chilling to the Core”

January Reading Re-Cap!

Hi guys! January was definitely a crazy month for me. I got off for an entire week due to snow, but I did win first place in DECA regionals! I met and chatted with so many amazing authors over the past few weeks, and I am really excited to see the blog grow even more in 2018. Also, I’m beginning to Bookstagram, which is going to be fun yet a bit challenging. Somehow, I managed to squeeze in 11 books this month, which is a remarkable feat considering my schedule, and I’m hoping to finish many more soon!


5 Stars

The Shadow Queen by C. J. Redwine

The Shadow Queen

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Tempests and Slaughter by Tamora Pierce

Tempests and Slaughter

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Hunting Prince Dracula Blog Tour: Top Ten Quotes from Stalking Jack the Ripper + Giveaway

Hi guys! Today I am on a 5-day weekend because of parent-teacher conferences and Labor Day, so it’s going to be a break full of catching up on a bunch of stuff including studying, extarcurriculars, and reading! Today I am so glad to be a part of the Hunting Prince Dracula Blog Tour, and I have a physical ARC (yes, I have an actual physical ARC!) at home I’m so excited to dig in soon! To help you convince you to get both Stalking Jack the Ripper and Hunting Prince Dracula, I am doing my Top 10 Favorite Quotes from Stalking Jack the Ripper!

Tour Banner2


Title: Hunting Prince Dracula 33784373(Stalking Jack the Ripper #2)

Author: Kerri Maniscalco

Pub. Date: September 19th, 2017

Publisher: Little, Brown & Company

Format: Hardcover, eBook, Audiobook

Pages: 448

Synopsis: In this hotly anticipated sequel to the haunting #1 bestseller Stalking Jack the Ripper, bizarre murders are discovered in the castle of Prince Vlad the Impaler, otherwise known as Dracula. Could it be a copycat killer…or has the depraved prince been brought back to life?

Following the grief and horror of her discovery of Jack the Ripper’s true identity, Audrey Rose Wadsworth has no choice but to flee London and its memories. Together with the arrogant yet charming Thomas Cresswell, she journeys to the dark heart of Romania, home to one of Europe’s best schools of forensic medicine…and to another notorious killer, Vlad the Impaler, whose thirst for blood became legend.

But her life’s dream is soon tainted by blood-soaked discoveries in the halls of the school’s forbidding castle, and Audrey Rose is compelled to investigate the strangely familiar murders. What she finds brings all her terrifying fears to life once again.

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Pre-Order Hunting Prince Dracula here!

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Also, Kerri is hosting a pre-order giveaway where if you send her proof of purchase, you can get a Stalking Jack the Ripper novella that is set in Thomas’s point of view! You do not want to miss Meeting Thomas Cresswell! Check out the details here!

Continue reading “Hunting Prince Dracula Blog Tour: Top Ten Quotes from Stalking Jack the Ripper + Giveaway”