Review: Golden by K. M. Robinson

Hola mi amigos! (I know I don’t speak Spanish, but I do have some Spanish blood actually!) If you don’t know what that translates to, it means “Hi my friends!” Two more days til SE-YA!!! I am super excited! You might be tired of hearing me talk about SE-YA, but I am super excited! There are so many authors I want to meet, like David Arnold, Mindy McGinnis, Sharon Cameron, Tobie Easton, M. Tara Crowl, Brittany Goodwin, Shaila Patel, and Jennifer M. Eaton! But for now, here is my review of Golden by K.M. Robinson, which is one of my most anticipated reads of 2017!

Disclaimer: I received a free e-ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. This will not affect my review in any way.

golden-cover-reveal-feb-9-2017-by-k-m-robinsonGoodreads Summary: When the girl with the golden hair betrays everyone, not even she has hope of surviving.

The stories say that Goldilocks was a naïve girl who wandered into a house one day. Those stories were wrong. She was never naïve. It was all a perfectly executed plan to get her into the Baers’ group to destroy them.

Trained by her cousin, Lowell, and handler, Shadoe, Auluria’s mission is to destroy the Baers by getting close to the youngest brother, Dov, his brother and sister-in-law and the leaders of the Baers’ group. When she realizes Dov isn’t as evil as her cousin led her to believe, she must figure out how to play both sides or her deception will cause everyone in her world to burn.

If her allegiances are discovered, either side could destroy her…if the Society doesn’t get her first.

Rating: 9/10 Stars

Overall Thoughts: Golden was really one of my most anticipated reads of 2017 (along with Blood Rose Rebellion, These Ruthless Deeds, Caraval, The United Continuums, The Traitor’s Kiss… where was I?) I had really high expectations for this book, but it reached it like 211 degrees Fahrenheit. It was really good, like hot, but it didn’t exactly reach that boiling point to make it a new favorite. Regardless, I really liked it. There were times when I couldn’t put the book down and my eyes were glued on my device’s screen!

Retelling: So this book is a retelling on Goldilocks. I think I would prefer this book over the original fairy tale any day! It infuses the original naïve girl with romance, action, secrets, and espionage; it was really unique! Now everyone is human in this book, just a bit of a head’s up. It was a little hard for me to transition from actual bears to the human Baers, but it catches onto you after a while.

Action: This book will definitely give you thrills and chills. The author packed the book with some plot twists, and my jaw dropped at a few of them. I actually screamed once because I was like “Oh my goodness!” and “I knew it!” (I made a prediction and I was right! First one! Yes!) Those plot twists, oh my! I just love whenever a book includes them!

Plot: There were a few parts that didn’t exactly click with me. There were some things that were so sudden or so fast I was wondering where in the world did that element come from. I did think there were some scenes in the middle and end that could have been removed because it stalled the plot and some scenes that were a bit confusing to me. Nevertheless, I enjoyed it!

My Review in a Nutshell: I really liked this book. No doubt. I was hooked from the beginning! There’s not that many Goldilocks retellings out there, yet this one definitely put a unique spin on Goldilocks! This is a great start to K. M. Robinson’s writing career!

What are your favorite fairy tale retellings? What are you most anticipated reads of 2017? Comment below, and we’ll chat soon!

+ J.M.J.

Happy Reading!

~ Kester

 

Of the Trees Blog Tour: Interview with E. M. Fitch

Hi guys! Happy Monday! It’s already March, can you believe it? Welcome to our tour stop for the Of the Trees Blog Tour, and we are hosting author E.M. Fitch in an exclusive interview! We also have a giveaway that is at the bottom of this post if you want to check it out and enter!

 

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Title: OF THE TREESof-the-trees

Author: E.M. Fitch

Pub. Date: February 28, 2017

Publisher: Month9Books

Format: Paperback, eBook

Pages: 345

Find it: Goodreads | Amazon | B&N | TBD | iBooks | Kobo | Google Play Books | Indiebound

Synopsis: Cassie and Laney fancy themselves amateur ghost hunters. When a carnival comes to town, Cassie embraces the chance to try something new.

Carnival workers watch the girls with a collective gaze that ignites in Laney a dark and dangerous fascination, leaving Cassie unnerved.

It’s not just their age or the unsettling way they stare. There is something in the shifting of their skin and the way their features seem to change in the shadows.

Cassie can’s shake this sickening feeling that there’s more to the carnival than meets the eye.

When townspeople suddenly start dying and bloody warnings appear around town, Cassie is lured into a nightmare where trees whisper and strange, shape-shifting men haunt the backwoods she once hunted for ghosts with her best friend.

Then Laney goes missing, and only Cassie can get her back. But the creatures of the trees aren’t simply going to hand Laney over to Cassie without getting something in return.

 

About E.M:e-m-fitch

E.M. Fitch is an author who loves scary stories, chocolate, and tall trees. When not dreaming up new ways to torture characters, she is usually corralling her four children or thinking of ways to tire them out so she can get an hour of peace at night. She lives in Connecticut, surrounded by chaos, which she manages (somewhat successfully) with her husband, Marc.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

 

 

Now onto the interview!

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1. How would you describe Of the Trees if you had only 10 words to use?

Dark fairies lure young women into the forest.

2. Why do you love writing? When did you first have a love for writing, and how was it formed?

It’s not just that I love writing, it’s that I couldn’t exist without writing. That’s not to say there aren’t days in which I can’t stand writing, trust me. I groan and moan and say to myself, “Why am I even doing this?!” But in the end, I’m always drawn back. There are stories in my head, and they want out, darn it!

If I’m being honest, my first love for storytelling began when I was very young. I adored the Oz books, Sword in the Stone, The Hobbit. There were never enough stories for me, despite how many books my parents brought home. So I started making them up. My mother still has a box of cringe-worthy, self-illustrated short stories that I wrote decades ago. Fiction got tossed to the side during my college years, I was so absorbed in studying and working full time that there was much less time for make-believe stories to circle my brain. One night, on break at work, I absently picked up Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (it was the only book laying around the breakroom). I finished half the book that night. I devoured as much of the series that was published at that time, and then I needed more. But there wasn’t any! Not Harry Potter, at least. I found lots of other Young Adult fiction to satisfy my needs, but something about Harry kept drawing me back. And so, drawing on those same urges I had as a child, I needed to finish Harry’s story. J.K. Rowling was taking much too long for me. I got into fanfiction writing. Now this was long, long before I ever considered doing this whole writing thing professionally; I felt I was just messing around. My husband is also an author, and he was in a Master of Fine Arts program at the time. Imagine us attending lots of dreary poetry readings and lectures with warm red wine and questionable cheese left out in the corner – that’s a pretty accurate picture. At one of the events, a colleague of my husband’s asked me if I was a writer, too. I paused. Because, no, I wasn’t really. And yet I spent hours in front of my computer playing around with Harry and company, plotting, and tweaking storylines. It felt really silly to admit that (it still does), but I eventually stuttered out a response. “No, not really,” I said. She grinned over at me, said, “Oh, that means you are,” and walked away. I don’t remember who she was, what she looked like, and I couldn’t possibly tell you her name. But at that moment, I knew I was a writer. I began writing my first novel that year.

Side note: I can’t believe I just admitted that *hides face*

3. Who are your favorite authors, and which ones have had an impact on you? Who has affected your writing style the most?of-the-trees

My favorite authors include Becca Fitzpatrick, Libba Bray, Peter Straub, and John Marsden. Patrick Ness, as well, and he is probably one of the biggest influences on my fiction. Of course, now that I admitted to my Potter mania, I have to include J.K. Rowling. As to who has affected my writing style the most … it’s a tough call. I could claim that any of the names above has influenced my work, and that would be true. But I’ve also had the pleasure of meeting a wonderful friend and mentor, Mav Skye. Not only has she influenced me with her own stories and novels, which are dark and fascinating, I’ve had the absolute privilege of her advice/critiques on my work. Between my husband, Marc Fitch, and my friend, Mav Skye, I’ve had two authors championing me and kicking me in the rear. There’s nothing so impactful as people who believe in you.

4. What are your favorite genres to read and write? What are your favorite books?

I tend to stick to a lot of Young Adult fiction, something about those few years of your life just really sticks with you, doesn’t it? But broadly speaking, I adore fantasy/horror/paranormal/dystopian fiction. I enjoy a smidge of romance within all those dramas, and you can’t go wrong with a bit of steampunk/historical fiction. I’m also a fan of non-fiction, from books exploring Quantum Physics, to survival accounts. The Lord of the Rings trilogy will remain one of my all-time favorites. Harry Potter is another favorite, of course. I love the childhood classics of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz series, Peter Pan, Alice in Wonderland – but not Moby Dick. I hate that book. I enjoyed reading Ayn Rand, because her books read like the mean girl at a party, the one you know you shouldn’t be laughing with, but can’t help it. Patrick Ness’ Chaos Walking trilogy remains one of my all-time favorites, as well as John Marsden’s Tomorrow When the War Began series.

5. What do you do when you’re not writing? Is writing a part-time or full-time job?

Writing is absolutely a full time job. I love writing, and I treat it like a full time job, with time dedicated to it and deadlines I have to meet. I have several other full time jobs, however. I’m a mom to four wonderful kids, that’s a job in and of itself. I am also a pediatric psychiatric nurse, and I work the most wonderful group of staff and patients. Whenever I’m not at my computer or in the hospital, I enjoy being outside. I love campfires, ghost stories, hiking, the beach, old cemeteries, historic battlefields, museums, and libraries.

6. Do you believe in ghosts or anything paranormal? Would you hunt one down in one of the creepiest haunted houses?

I believe in spirits and the afterlife, I’m not so convinced about the Casper the Friendly Ghost figures drifting around haunted houses. Would I seek them out? Sure! Because that sounds like fun! I have enjoyed many trips to haunted cemeteries, hotels, houses. I love those haunted history walks, and I’ve gone through San Francisco, St. Augustine, and countless others. I’ve never seen anything, and for as much fun as I have on ghost hunts, I honestly hope to never find one. I just enjoy the cheap thrill of looking.

7. Are you a fan of carnivals or fairs? What’s your favorite carnival ride or game?

I enjoy both carnivals and fairs, though I prefer the smaller, hometown versions and not the gigantic, state-wide affairs. Favorite ride? Anything that goes fast! Or, ooh! That thing that spins and spins and spins and pins you to the side? And then you can flip upside down? Or to the side? I love that one! Centrifugal force at its best.

8. What made you attracted to the Young Adult genre as a reader and writer?

So back before I was writing, I was reading. But being a young mother, who had just gotten out of college having completed a nursing and a psychology degree, I had no time to keep up with what books were out there. I hadn’t really read for pleasure in years, and I had no idea where to start. I looked online and found this website where you could put in the books you read and loved, and they would recommend titles. That seemed so wonderful to me, like Netflix but for books! So I jotted down a few titles that looked promising, walked to my local library, and looked them up. Every title, every single one, had me going to the children’s section! I was surprised, and a little embarrassed. I didn’t even know YA was a thing, couldn’t have told you that that was where my tastes lay; but I went to the kid’s section, quickly pulled the books I wanted off the shelf, and scurried out of there. The first title I grabbed was A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray. I loved it! So I kept marching back to the children’s section, kept pulling titles. When I finally decided to take my writing seriously, it felt completely natural to gravitate toward YA literature. I write what I love, YA books that usually feature a dystopian/horror/supernatural element.

So I fell into writing YA, but I make the choice to stay there. I love working with teens, and I love writing teenage protagonists. There’s just something about those years in which people are this amazing combination of intelligent and naïve, resourceful and vulnerable. Teens can see the world in a whole new way, and also exhibit flashes of ancient wisdom, grace, and sensitivity. I love the struggles of identity formation, finding who you are. These make for great literary devices, and are such wonderful things to explore in the characters you create. There’s also a massive amount of growth – intellectual, emotional, physical – when you’re a teenager, and that’s another element of great fiction, character growth. Whatever drew me to YA fiction, I’m forever grateful that I’m here.

9. How do you cure writer’s block?

I don’t get writer’s block, per se. There’s times I get stuck on certain scenes, and then I just move to different scenes. I go back and forth with creative ventures, sometimes I need a break from writing and then I dive into promos, social media, website building. I read a lot. I love projects, to the point where my husband cringes when I mention I wasn’t to build something new. I like to try my hand in anything, building furniture, refinishing pieces, painting, landscaping – but my true creative love is writing, and so those are my little breaks, and then I dive back into my work.

10. If you had one book with you on a deserted island, which one would it be?

I’m torn here. I hate to pull a Dwight Schrute here and give such a dry, boring answer, but… it would most likely be The Physician’s Desk Reference. Possibly a book on regional edible plants? That, or the Bible.

11. Your Break Free series takes place during a zombie apocalypse. What would you do if a zombie apocalypse broke out?

Grab my machete! Gather my family, and get out to the woods and away from civilization. Head south (it’s too cold to survive winters for long in my neck of the woods). My ideal would be to head to a marina, snag myself a boat, and sail off to find a quiet little island and wait out the apocalypse. That being said, zombies are pesky beings, and plans go awry. I’d do my best to adapt to the situations thrown at me.

12. What’s a typical day of writing like for you?e-m-fitch

Can you hear my laughter from where you’re sitting?? There is no typical day for me, but I’ll try to give you a glimpse. Wake up, brush teeth, coffee, chase children, feed children, teach children, play with children, repeat some of those tasks, put children to bed. Two nights a week I then drive to work for some overnight shifts at the hospital I work in, the rest of my evenings are spent quietly in my home. The writing happens between all of that. Currently, I have dinner cooking on the stove and the boys are playing with their father, who just got home from work, so I’m answering a question at a time while going back to stir the fajitas. Nighttime is the most peaceful for me, so I tend to stay up way, way too late. When I get caught in a writing haze, I can be up to two or three in the morning, just typing away. I catch little bits of time here and there, and somehow out of all this chaos, novels are born.

13. If Of the Trees was made into a movie, who would you have as the director, and who would you have as the cast?

Alfonso Cuarón would be my top pick for director. I like how he can work with such diverse subject material. His visual storytelling is incredibly expressive, and Cuarón has a way of holding the audience right where he wants them.

I don’t know what role I’d give her, perhaps Laney, but I would want Saoirse Ronan there. I think she’s an amazing actress, so compelling to watch, and she truly becomes her characters.

14. Have you written any other works? What are your current plans with your writing career?

Of The Trees is my fourth novel to be published. Previously published is my Young Adult zombie trilogy, The Break Free Series. As for what’s next, I have the sequel to Of The Trees, entitled Darkness Cannot Hide Her, completed and ready for edits. I have another YA novel entitled The Monsters Within that is also complete, and for which I will be seeking representation. I’m currently writing a YA ghost story that hasn’t yet earned its title, and just for fun, I’m writing and publishing as many short stories as I can.

15. Do you have any tips to any aspiring authors or writers?

Keep writing. If that’s what you’re meant to do, if there’s stories in your head that just don’t quit, then don’t give up. Don’t get stuck on your first novel, don’t worry about making it perfect. Just go on and write your next book, and then your next. Find yourself some honest critiques, throw your work out there, and don’t get disheartened by the hundreds of rejections that will come your way. Those come to everyone. If it’s something you’re meant to do, do it.

Thanks so much, E. M., for coming onto our blog and doing this interview! Great answers!

 

Now here’s the giveaway!

Giveaway Details:

1 winner will receive a $25 Fandango Gift Card, US Only.

A Rafflecopter Giveaway

 

Tour Schedule:

Week One:

2/27/2017- Lisa’s Loves(Books of Course)– Interview

2/27/2017- Never Too Many To Read– Review

2/27/2017- Julie Reece– Excerpt

2/28/2017- Tales of the Ravenous Reader– Guest Post

2/28/2017- Book Review Becca– Review

3/1/2017- Two Chicks on Books– Interview

3/1/2017- Omg Books and More Books– Review

3/2/2017- Always & Forever Fangirling– Excerpt

3/2/2017- Bookaholic Banter– Review

3/3/2017- Rockin’ Book Reviews– Guest Post

3/3/2017- Quantum– Review

 

Week Two:

3/6/2017- LILbooKlovers– Interview

3/6/2017- Don’t Judge, Read– Review

3/7/2017- The Book Adventures of Annelise Lestrange– Excerpt

3/7/2017- Book Lovers Life– Review

3/8/2017- Hidden Worlds Books– Guest Post

3/8/2017- Book-Keeping– Review

3/9/2017- Bibliobibuli YA– Interview

3/9/2017- StephanieCassidyBlog– Review

3/10/2017- So Few Books– Interview

3/10/2017- I am not a bookworm!– Review

 

Thank you so much for checking out our tour stop, and please chat with us below! What is your favorite YA paranormal book? Have you read or are going to read Of the Trees? Comment below, and let’s chat!

+ J.M.J.

~Kester

 

Exclusive Interview with Helene Dunbar

Hi guys! Happy Presidents’ Day! We don’t have a giveaway planned for this week, but we do have a special interview with Helene Dunbar, author of These Gentle Wounds! I loved this book, and it’s really haunting and chilling! Hope you enjoy this interview!

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1. What is your book These Gentle Wounds about? these-gentle-wounds-final

These Gentle Wounds is about Gordie, a boy who is the lone survivor of a horrific family tragedy. It opens five years after that event, at a time when Gordie feels as though his life is as “normal” as it is ever going to be, given his abuse and trauma-related PTSD. But the reemergence of his biological father, the person he blames for the tragedy, turns everything upside down and he is forced to figure out how to draw upon strength he never knew he had, in order to move forward.

It is a story of strength and brotherhood and complicated relationships. 

2. Why do you love writing? When did you first have a love for writing, and how was it formed?

I’ve written as long as I can remember. In high school, I was editor of our newspaper and literary magazine. I even went to journalism camp. My goal, which I achieved, was to work as a drama critic, but finding full-time work there is hard, so I moved to marketing writing. I came to fiction writing very, very late.

3. Who are your favorite authors, and which ones have had an impact on you? Who has affected your writing style the most?

I have favorite books more than favorite authors. Usually I fall deeply in love with a book and then am disappointed to find the author going in a different direction with their other work, although I totally understand that because I do it myself.

It’s hard to say who has had an effect on my writing style. I come from the world of drama and journalism, so some of that probably leaks through and it’s probably why I love writing dialogue because theatre is, of course, 99% dialogue.

I can say that when I started writing fiction, I spent a lot of time analyzing books by Maggie Steifvater, Hannah Moskowitz, and Andrew Smith as kind of my own fiction-writing tutorial.

4. What are your favorite genres to read and write? What are your favorite books?

The books that got me back into reader were Melissa Marr’s Wicked Lovely series, but I primarily read contemporary.

My favorite books are a mixed bag, but here are a couple: Amber Dermont’s THE STARBOARD SEA, Hannah Moskowitz’s TEETH, Donna Tartt’s THE SECRET HISTORY, and my all-time favorite is Evelyn Waugh’s BRIDESHEAD REVISITED; I’ve always been fascinated by that period of English history.

5. What do you do when you’re not writing? Is writing a part-time or full-time job? helene1_

When I’m not writing, I’m a wife and mom. Currently I have a number of part-time jobs all of which involve writing in one way or another, but I’m preparing to go back to full-time work in communications I’m also a long-time freelancer for an Irish magazine called Irish Music Magazine, covering traditional music in the US, which is a huge passion of mine.

6. How much research did you have to complete to make Gordie’s case of PTSD as authentic as you could?

I spent a lot of time in PTSD forums, read many, many articles, and drew on some of my own experiences as well.

7. The title of These Gentle Wounds still intrigues me. What is the origin of the title, and why is “these” in These Gentle Wounds a different font than the other words?

The book was originally called “In Case of Emergency”, which wasn’t a title I really loved. Titles have never been my strong-suit and These Gentle Wounds came as a suggestion from my Flux editor, Brian Farrey. We discussed the idea of how mental health issues aren’t the same as physical issues because they can’t be easily seen and that makes it, in some ways, so much more difficult for anyone who is wrestling with them.

As for the italics, you’d have to ask Flux.

8. Who was your favorite character to write and why?

In TGW, my favorite was probably Kevin, Gordie’s brother. I did a lot of work on him very late in the revision process because his scars are harder to see than Gordie’s. Since Gordie was directly involved in the incident and Kevin wasn’t, I really wanted to show how the event damaged both kids in very different ways. Kevin has a lot of survivor’s guilt and that comes out in a variety of not-always-productive ways.

9. Gordie’s favorite sport is hockey while Sarah’s favorite hobby is photography. Are you interested in either hockey or photography?

I grew up in Detroit, so I love hockey. Gordie was named after Gordie Howe. I don’t have a particular interest or talent in photography.

10. I saw that you are a Pitch Wars mentor. Could you describe to us what Pitch Wars is and what you do in it?

PitchWars is a writing “contest” started by the amazing Brenda Drake. Mentors publicize the type of manuscripts they’d like to work with. Writers then “query” us. We choose a project to work on and basically put the writer through boot camp, helping them revise and polish their manuscript in order to get it read for agents.

It is a crazy amount of work, but is massively rewarding. I’ve worked with two authors who have gone on to sign with amazing agents and I couldn’t be prouder of them.

11. In your bio, you state that you have lived in two countries and six states. Where have you moved, and how did you end up in Nashville? Which one was your favorite place to live?

I’m from Michigan, and in chronological order the list would be: Michigan, Chicago, DC, New York, New Jersey, New York, England, New York, Nashville. I’m very good at packing.

My heart will always be in New York. I moved to Nashville to work (briefly) for a record label and because my Scottish-born husband really wanted to get out of the city. It’s home for now.

12. How do you cure a case of writer’s block?

I rarely have writer’s block, my probably is usually a lack of time to sit down and write. But I’m also a believer in giving myself a break when I need it. So if I’m not on deadline and boring myself when I sit down on write, I just take time off until I’m hungry for it again.

13. One of my favorite quotes in the book was when Ms. DeSilva said to Gordie, “See, I told you that you were brave.” Bravery is one of the central themes that surrounds this book. What is the message that you are trying to tell your readers with Gordie’s story?

I believe that everyone has more strength, courage, and love inside them than they give themselves credit for. TGW is really a story of Gordie learning to believe in himself and if there is a message to this book that would be it.

14. Have you written any other works? What are also your current plans with your writing career? what-remains

TGW was my debut. WHAT REMAINS came out in 2015 and I have a book releasing later this year called BOOMERANG, which is a book that means a great deal to me. More information on it is up on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28271395-boomerang

15. Do you have any tips to any aspiring authors or writers?

Read. Read. Read. Then write according to your heart and not the marketplace.

Try to learn patience. Publishing is a very slow business.

Find your community. Writing is isolating, and bonds with other writers can get you through the storms.

Thank you so much, Helene, for coming onto our blog!

If you want to check out Helene’s books and social media, click below!

Website  |  Twitter  |  Facebook  |  Tumblr  |  Goodreads

Amazon  |  Barnes & Noble

‘Til Next Time! – Kester

Guest Post + GIVEAWAY with J. L. Pattison: Tips on Using Social Media for Writers who Don’t Like Using It

Hi guys! Happy Monday! Today we are having speculative fiction author J. L. Pattison here on our blog! His short stories The Visitor and Alibi Interrupted were some of the greatest short stories I have read! They were really good! You can find links to both reviews and the original post below, along with a special giveaway for his newest book Saving Kennedy, which is the paperback book with both stories included! Go check it out!

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6 Tips on Using Social Media for Writers who Don’t Like Using Social Media.

If you’re anything like me, you loathe the time-wasting medium of social media. But as authors (especially independent authors), it is a necessary evil you must dabble with if you hope to market your books and your brand.

One of the things I dislike about Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, et al, is their addicting nature. Like a mermaid, social media sings its irresistible songs to seduce writers to waste their time scrolling through YouTube videos, poorly spelled memes, personal relationship drama, and an endless supply of images of pets and meals.

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Check out my review of Alibi Interrupted here!

Well, have no fear, I am here to help.

The biggest obstacle you have to overcome is resisting the mermaid’s siren, and the biggest solution to that obstacle is to make social media harder to access.

And here are six ways to do just that:

1). Don’t download social media apps. Instead, force yourself to go through a browser which will take you a little longer to do.

2). After visiting a social media site, be sure to log out. By having to log back in every time to view them (through a browser), you’ve effectively removed the ease by which you can cavalierly access them.

3). Disable all notifications. If you’re not being alerted about a new post or message on social media, you won’t know if you’re missing anything. Keeping notifications on is like entering a bakery when you’re on a diet. Don’t enter the bakery, and don’t enable notifications.

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See my review of The Visitor here!

4). Determine to visit social media only once a day (or two days). Pick mornings or evenings (or whatever time is good for you) and stick to it. This way you won’t feel the draw of checking social media every free moment you have because you’ve agreed that you’re only going to check them at predetermined times.

6). For every 12 hours (or 24 hours) that you don’t check your social media, reward yourself with something nice … like a donut.

I hope these are a help to you. If you have any other suggestions, please share them in the comments section.

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J.L. Pattison is the author of two speculative fiction ebooks, The Visitor and Alibi Interrupted, both of which are also available together in a two-story paperback collection entitled, Saving Kennedy. His latest book, The Island, is due to be released in the latter portion of this year. Pattison has lived in California, Nevada, and Florida, and is married with an amazing brood of children that keeps him young.
Now onto the giveaway!
All the rules can be found in the Giveaway Terms and Conditions. You must be 18 years or older or have the permission of a parent or guardian to enter.

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

I wish you all the best, and I hope you have the chance to check out J. L. Pattison’s amazing books!

 

Til next time! ~ Kester

Damaged Goods Blog Tour: Interview with Jennifer Bardsley

Hi guys! If you’re here on the Damaged Goods blog tour, welcome to my tour stop! What a great way to end the tour, huh? This series is actually one of my most anticipated reads of 2016! I can’t wait to start it! And today, I have the honor to interview the lovely Jennifer Bardsley, also known as the YA Gal! (*internally screaming insider because I’m so happy I got to interview her*). Let’s get on with the tour!

damaged-goods

 

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Title: DAMAGED GOODS (Blank Slate #2)

Author: Jennifer Bardsley

Pub. Date: January 17, 2017

Publisher: Month9Books

Format: Hardcover, Paperback, eBook

Pages: 300

Find it: Goodreads | Amazon | B&N | TBD

Synopsis:

Blanca has everything she ever wanted, a hot boyfriend named Seth and the loving support of her foster father, Cal. She’s finally escaped the abusive control of her birth father, Barbelo Nemo, and her tortured childhood at Tabula Rasa School.

But the scars of Blanca’s Vestal upbringing run deep, especially when the FBI start asking questions. Blanca feels abandoned by Seth who is hunting for Lilith, Blanca’s only blood relative. The Defectos, a support group of Vestal-Rejects, offer Blanca comfort instead.

While the Vestal order crumbles, Chinese rivals called the Guardians rise to power and wrest control of important Tabula Rasa contacts. Now Blanca’s life is in peril once more, and this time, Blanca struggles to recognize friend from foe.

 

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Title: GENESIS GIRL (Blank Slate #1)

Author: Jennifer Bardsley

Pub. Date: June 14, 2016

Publisher: Month9Books

Format: Hardcover, Paperback, eBook

Pages: 280

Find it: Goodreads | Amazon |  B&N | iBooks | Kobo | Books A Million | Google Play | IndieBound

Synopsis:

Eighteen-year-old Blanca has lived a sheltered life. Her entire childhood has been spent at Tabula Rasa School where she’s been protected from the Internet. 

Blanca has never been online and doesn’t even know how to text. Her lack of a virtual footprint makes her extremely valuable, and upon graduation, Blanca and those like her are sold to the highest bidders.

Blanca is purchased by Cal McNeal, who uses her to achieve personal gain. But the McNeals are soon horrified by just how obedient and non-defiant Blanca is. All those mind-numbing years locked away from society have made her mind almost impenetrable. 

By the time Blanca is ready to think for herself, she is trapped. Her only chance of escape is to go online. 

 

About Jennifer: jennifer-bardsley

Jennifer Bardsley writes the parenting column “I Brake for Moms” for the Sunday edition of The Everett Daily HeraldShe also blogs at Teaching My Baby to Read with the mission of sparking a national debate on the important roll parents play in education. Jennifer is a graduate of Stanford University and a member of SCBWI. She lives with her husband and two children in Edmonds, WA.

GENESIS GIRL will release in 2016 and is about an 18 year-old girl whose lack of a virtual footprint makes her so valuable that she is auctioned off to the highest bidder, the sequel  will come out in 2017. Jennifer is represented by Liza Fleissig of the Liza Royce Literary Agency LLC.

Follow the Jennifer on FacebookTwitterInstagram, and Goodreads.

 

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Interview with Jennifer Bardsley:

Kester: In your own words, what is your Blank Slate series about?

Jennifer: The Blank Slate series is about a teenager named Blanca who grew up in a quasi-religious cult called the Vestals, where she was shielded from the Internet for eighteen years. Blanca grew up with no online profile or digital footprint. All the Vestals were blank slates, and since that is so rare, it made them valuable. In GENESIS GIRL Blanca’s digital purity gets auctioned off to the highest bidder. In DAMAGED GOODS, Blanca struggles to overcome the brainwashing of her past.

Kester: Why do you love writing? When did you first have a love for writing, and how was it formed?

Jennifer: I grew up keeping a diary. It’s really hard to commit to a diary, and I flaked out a whole bunch, but did manage to write a few times a month. Now I have diaries from when I was ten to fifteen that I treasure. If I was a teenager today though, I’d probably have an anonymous blog instead.

Continue reading “Damaged Goods Blog Tour: Interview with Jennifer Bardsley”