Discussion: Reality Has So Much to Offer, Just Like Reading

Hi everybody! I usually don’t post many discussions, but because it is summer and I’ve had a bit more time to write, I’ve decided to write this little reflection about reading versus reality, especially since I’ve had so many great experiences this past school year and it’s been tough finding the will to read during my “emotional hangovers.” I hope you enjoy this post and maybe ponder over when it’s best to choose between reading and reality.


Sometimes We Need to Choose Reality Over Reading

Reading has always been my escape. When I feel lonely or dejected, burdened or stressed, I just pull out a book and become transported into another world. I want to become amazed by the magic in fantasies, moved by the raw truth of contemporaries, or enlightened by the real inspirations in historical fiction. Stories turn the ordinary of my life into the extraordinary, full of whizzing technologies, majestic creatures, and relatable characters that I would like to befriend in reality.

I have always been an emotional guy. I let my heart take control sometimes. And after undergoing through many amazing experiences in my junior year, it became hard to read at times. When the school year ended and my time in my high school elite choir the Madrigals came to a close, my heart swelled with so many feelings that I could not finish more than a couple of pages in my book. During my time at TN Boys State, I did not want to read since the time I could use to hang out with so many of the awesome delegates there was very limited and precious.

There was even a moment when I doubted myself as a reader. I did not want to read anymore. Thankfully, after my emotional hangovers had subsided a bit, my bibliophilia was restored. I admit, I can be a bit volatile at times—which is why I need to think with my head before I let my heart steer the reigns—but I have learned a valuable lesson from all of these events.

Now I am not trying to degrade reading at all. That is not the point of this essay. In fact, I commend people who can read hundreds, if not thousands, of books a year. I wish I could do that! And I want those who do that to keep on doing that.

But I have learned that sometimes you need to close your book, go out, and take on new experiences. While books are portals into new lives and new places, the real world can be just as exciting. My junior year of high school has been filled with events and memories that I will never forget. I have sung at venues that I would never imagine performing at (from Christmas caroling to All Northwest Honor Chori), toured our nation’s capital, made many friends at Boys State, attended two book festivals, and brought home the coveted DECA glass from SCDC. I have strengthened my current friendships, discovered a second family in my choir, and connected with people from all around the state. I have stood on the very steps where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., gave his “I Have a Dream” speech and witnessed the actual flag that flew at Fort McHenry during the War of 1812 that inspired “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Those were some of the best moments of my life, and I will cherish those memories forever.

Now not everyone has the same opportunities as I do, but every person’s life is equipped with all sorts of opportunities to fill it with love, with excitement, with awe, with gratitude. Whether it be a bustling city or a quaint small town, there is always something to do and somewhere to go.

However, there are times when we need to read to find consolation and refuge from the trials and darkness of the outside world. When life is tough for me, I often pull out a book to be transported to a new realm where I could feel accepted, or at least connect with characters that are going through troubles that could relate with what I am going through. I credit books with keeping me company when I feel alone in a crowd, calming me when I feel nervous and stressed, and boosting me with hope when I feel dejected. I have learned so many lessons from these stories, and they’ve aroused in me a kinder and more adventurous spirit.

But in order for these novels to truly change our lives, we need to go out and put these lessons and newfound feelings to the test. We need to go out into the world and make new encounters. It is great to read on the beach with the cool breeze in your hair, in the mountains full of peace and quiet, next to the fireplace with a blanket and a cup of cocoa. But don’t forget that those places can make new memories outside of stories, from swimming on the beach, hiking and marveling at God’s glorious creation, and bonding with friends and family on a cold winter’s night. Experience the world around you. There are lots of things to do, places to visit, people to meet, and events to attend. Traveling to a fictional world is an amazing experience that can teach so much about life, but the real world can be life-changing as well.

Yes, George R. R. Martin is right when he says, “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads only lives one.” But don’t forget that reality has so much to offer, so much to be explored, so much to be written, so much to be experienced.


Happy Reading!

+ J.M.J.

~ Kester

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