March Reading Recap!

Hi guys! Happy Easter! May the glory of Christ’s resurrection provide you strength and bless you continually throughout your lives! I pray that God may guide each of you throughout your lives. Today, I am posting my March Reading Re-Cap, and surprisingly I managed to finish so many books regardless of my extremely busy schedule. My Spring Break is also about to end, but I’ve certainly recharged with a lot of rest, prayer, and reading these past few days. I hope you enjoy this post, and have a blessed day!


5 Stars

Open If You Dare by Dana Middleton

Open If You Dare

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The Queens of Innis Lear Blog Tour: Book Review — A Brilliant and Epic Fantasy Retelling of Shakespeare’s King Lear

Hi guys! I hope you are all having a great Good Friday, and for Christians full of prayer and mediation. Today I’ll be a bit less active in the spirit of the day, and I’m eagerly awaiting Easter, the day that Christ has risen from the dead! When I got back from DECA SCDC a few weeks ago, I received in the mail a huge book called The Queens of Innis Lear by Tessa Gratton. I love fantasy, but I was very surprised by its massive size. I am so glad to be on the Blog Tour for this wonderful King Lear fantasy retelling, and I hope that you will check out Tessa’s latest novel!

The Queens of Innis Lear Tour Banner


About the BookThe Queens of Innis Lear

A kingdom at risk, a crown divided, a family drenched in blood.

The erratic decisions of a prophecy-obsessed king have drained Innis Lear of its wild magic, leaving behind a trail of barren crops and despondent subjects. Enemy nations circle the once-bountiful isle, sensing its growing vulnerability, hungry to control the ideal port for all trade routes.

The king’s three daughters—battle-hungry Gaela, master manipulator Reagan, and restrained, starblessed Elia—know the realm’s only chance of resurrection is to crown a new sovereign, proving a strong hand can resurrect magic and defend itself. But their father will not choose an heir until the longest night of the year, when prophecies align and a poison ritual can be enacted.

Refusing to leave their future in the hands of blind faith, the daughters of Innis Lear prepare for war—but regardless of who wins the crown, the shores of Innis will weep the blood of a house divided.

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4 Stars

Disclaimer: Thanks so much to Tor and JeanBookNerd for sending me a hardcover copy of this book in exchange for an honest review for the blog tour. This will not affect my review in any way.

To be honest, when I first received this book, I felt overwhelmed by its massive size: 576 pages with the print smaller and packed tightly. I did not think at first I would be able to complete it by today. When I first started The Queens of Innis Lear, Part One went by very slowly. I thought to myself, “How will I be able to get through this tome at this pace?” and I read lighter books when I did not feel in the mood for an extremely dark adult fantasy. But as I went on, deeper and deeper into the storyline, I found myself not wanting to stop. I became entranced by all the bloodshed, the betrayal, and the magic, and everything started to play in my mind like a movie. Miraculously, I’m writing this book on the Sunday before this review/tour stop is supposed to go live, and I’m writing in a bit of a different style than I normally do.

The Queens of Innis Lear is a clever and imaginative epic fantasy retelling of Shakespeare’s King Lear with a Game of Thrones-esque atmosphere. I am not familiar with King Lear at all before reading this novel, so I decided to read the Wikipedia summary (gasp! though I highly recommend it before reading this book) of the play to get some background information. Gratton truly kept the essence of Shakespeare’s original work while adding her own fantasy elements and literary style, which created a beautiful and elegant masterpiece of prose and morality. I loved how names and events were very similar to the play’s (such as Elia = Cordelia, Regan = Regan, Gaela = Goneril, Elia/Cordelia is banished from Innis Lear/England, illegitimate Ban/Edmund devises a plan to exile his true-blood brother Rory/Edgar). The world-building of the entire novel just fascinated me, and I did not want to leave! All my questions about who’s who and what’s what became answered as I progressed further into the novel. I wish there was a map, though — that would make the reading experience even better!

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